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Other contributors to Whole Earth appeared in Wired, including William Gibson, who was featured on Wired's cover in its first year and whose article "Disneyland with the Death Penalty" in issue 1.4 resulted in the publication being banned in Singapore.

yet despite the fact that Kelly was involved in launching the WELL, an early source of public access to the Internet and even earlier non-Internet online experience, Wired's first issue de-emphasized the Internet, and covered interactive games, cell-phone hacking, digital special effects, military simulations, and Japanese otaku.

In 2005, Wired received the National Magazine Award for General Excellence in the category of 500,000 to 1,000,000 subscribers.

In 2008, Wired was nominated for three National Magazine Awards and won the ASME for Design.

The magazine was founded by American journalist Louis Rossetto and his partner Jane Metcalfe, along with Ian Charles Stewart in 1993 with initial backing from software entrepreneur Charlie Jackson and eclectic academic Nicholas Negroponte of the MIT Media Lab, who was a regular columnist for six years, through 1998 and wrote the book Being Digital.

The founding designers were John Plunkett and Barbara Kuhr (Plunkett Kuhr), beginning with a 1991 prototype and continuing through the first five years of publication, 1993–98.

However, Wired News remained responsible for republishing Wired magazine's content online due to an agreement when Condé Nast purchased the magazine.

The magazine was quickly followed by a companion website Hot Wired, a book publishing division, Hard Wired, a Japanese edition, and a short-lived British edition, Wired UK. In 1994, John Battelle, co-founding editor, commissioned Jules Marshall to write a piece on the Zippies.

The cover story broke records for being one of the most publicized stories of the year and was used to promote Wired's Hot Wired news service.

Anderson's article for "Wired" on this paradigm related to research on power law distribution models carried out by Clay Shirky, specifically in relation to bloggers.

Anderson widened the definition of the term in capitals to describe a specific point of view relating to what he sees as an overlooked aspect of the traditional market space which has been opened up by new media.